When you need bookbook support

Medieval bookbook support Ikea’s new advertising campaign is a hoot, mocking Apple and our obsession with the latest gadget and all its conveniences.  The Ikea bookbook has no cables, its battery life is eternal, an expandable interface, and a navigation based on ‘tactile touch technology’. Content is pre-installed!  To start browsing, ‘simply touch and go – … Continue reading When you need bookbook support

From Berlin to New York: the origins of Blue Note

There was still a fortnight to go when the postman handed me an early Christmas present.  Out of the blue, and unprecedented, I was the lucky winner of a competition. The prize was a copy of Uncompromising Expression by Richard Havers, a massive, magnificent and beautifully-illustrated book published by Thames and Hudson (who awarded me the prize) to commemorate … Continue reading From Berlin to New York: the origins of Blue Note

Badgerlands: perturbation in the nation

CF Tunnicliffe, Badgers The badger is one of our best-loved animals – and yet, despite the fact there are more badgers per square mile in Britain than any other country, few of us have seen one (our one, magical encounter is described here).  I have just finished reading Badgerlands in which Patrick Barkham sets out to trace the strange history of … Continue reading Badgerlands: perturbation in the nation

Donna Tartt’s ‘The Goldfinch': simply a good read

Donna Tartt, author of The Goldfinch I enjoyed reading Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, remaining gripped throughout its 800-odd pages.  Whether the novel amounted to a great deal more than a thoroughly good read: of that I’m doubtful.  The question only arises because of the serious issues hinted at, but not developed in any significant way, in … Continue reading Donna Tartt’s ‘The Goldfinch': simply a good read