Leviathan: politics, religion, and vodka (lots)

Leviathan, the latest film from Russian director Andrey Zvyagintsev, opens with waves beating upon a barren shore where rocks as old as the earth face an implacable, slate-grey sea. Tracking inland across barren wastes to an insistent Phillip Glass score, the camera encounters signs of human imprint on this unforgiving landscape: power lines, the hulks of wrecked and abandoned … Continue reading Leviathan: politics, religion, and vodka (lots)

‘The heartbeat of who we are': Jeanette Winterson on war, wealth and creativity

Jeanette Winterson She began with Dorothy Wordsworth walking the Lakeland fells in May 1800 and continued by way of Karl Marx, prehistoric cave painting, James Hargreaves’ spinning jenny, Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century,  John Maynard Keynes, Degas and the Arts Council, to arrive at the First World War and Wilfred Owen.  All this in the space of … Continue reading ‘The heartbeat of who we are': Jeanette Winterson on war, wealth and creativity

A 50 Year Argument: Scorsese’s take on The New York Review Of Books

Editor Bob Silvers in the NYRB office A 60-minute film about a literary journal celebrating half a century of publishing seems highly improbable, a less than enticing prospect.  Yet The New York Review of Books: A 50 Year Argument, directed by Martin Scorsese and shown on BBC4 last night was a rich and enthralling account of America’s leading journal … Continue reading A 50 Year Argument: Scorsese’s take on The New York Review Of Books

Ai Weiwei in the chapel at YSP: ‘The art always wins’

‘Iron tree’ by Ai Weiwei outside the chapel at Yorkshire Sculpture Park At Yorkshire Sculpture Park they recently completed the renovation of a sandstone chapel built in 1744 for the owners of Bretton Hall, the Palladian mansion that stands at the heart of the estate now devoted to art. The chapel was a place of worship for … Continue reading Ai Weiwei in the chapel at YSP: ‘The art always wins’