In Movement from Jack DeJohnette’s Trio: history, yet very much of the present

<em>In Movement</em> from Jack DeJohnette’s Trio: history, yet very much of the present

I’ve been listening to what will surely be the finest jazz record of the year – and one that I reckon will come to be regarded as one of the classic releases on the ECM label. It’s In Movement, the first release from Jack DeJohnette’s new trio who have been playing together for a couple of years. Now they have produced a very fine album of contemporary, full of historical resonances, on which all three musicians deliver stellar performances. Continue reading In Movement from Jack DeJohnette’s Trio: history, yet very much of the present”

Sapiens: a big history of the species

<em>Sapiens</em>: a big history of the species

Yuval Noah Harari’s Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind is a big book: it may be only 400 pages, but it’s scope is breathtaking. Don’t come to this book looking for dates or expositions of key historical events. Harari’s approach to history is to stand back and see what patterns emerge from the big picture. Continue reading Sapiens: a big history of the species”

Mustang: five free spirits corralled

<em>Mustang</em>: five free spirits corralled

School is out for the summer and five free-spirited teenage sisters head for the beach. Full of girlish exuberance, they splash in the sea with schoolboy friends. They swim, fight playfully, and clamber on the boys’ shoulders. We could be almost anywhere in the world, but this is a far-flung village on Turkey’s northern Black Sea coast, ‘a thousand kilometres from Istanbul’, and the teenage idyll is about to ‘turn to shit’, in the words of the youngest sister, Lale. Continue reading Mustang: five free spirits corralled”

Arild Anderson Trio at the Band on the Wall: fiery, intense, soulful

Arild Anderson Trio at the Band on the Wall: fiery, intense, soulful

Arild Andersen’s name has run like a thread through almost the entire history of ECM records, all the way back to the double-bass player’s collaboration with Jan Garbarek on Afric Pepperbird back in 1971. His most recent project has been the trio formed a decade ago with Paolo Vinaccia on drums and Tommy Smith on saxophone. I saw them play a spell-bindingly energetic set at Manchester’s Band on the Wall. Continue reading “Arild Anderson Trio at the Band on the Wall: fiery, intense, soulful”

Guy Clark: Songs of life, songs of hope

Guy Clark: Songs of life, songs of hope

Another good man has departed the world of music. But Guy Clark leaves behind some of the best songs ever to come out of Texas: down-to-earth, workmanlike, tender, and often with a touch of wry humour. Continue reading “Guy Clark: Songs of life, songs of hope”

The Kronos Quartet at RNCM: all kinds of music, every which way

The Kronos Quartet at RNCM: all kinds of music, every which way

There was a rare opportunity on Sunday evening to catch the Kronos Quartet in concert at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester.  No strangers to the capital, they rarely tour the UK as extensively as they are doing this month.

Kronos may look like a conventional string quartet (since 2013, they have consisted of founder David Harrington on violin; John Sherba, violin; Hank Dutt, viola; and Sunny Yang – the most recent recruit to the group – on cello), but their repertoire and approach to their instruments is far from conventional.

The quartet has been in existence for over 40 years, with only the cello player changing in that time. The eclectic Kronos repertoire draws largely – though far from exclusively – on 20th and 21st century contemporary classical music, and they are renowned for championing new music of all genres and from all parts of the world. All of which was evident in the exciting programme they presented at the RNCM. Before a packed concert hall, the Quartet drew a rapturous reception, and the thunderous applause they got at the close compelled the musicians to return to the stage four times for encores.

Continue reading “The Kronos Quartet at RNCM: all kinds of music, every which way”

Stories Only Exist When Remembered: a film of exquisite beauty

<em>Stories Only Exist When Remembered</em>: a film of exquisite beauty

One of the pleasures of blogging comes with the responses you sometimes get from a person you have never met, who may live on the other side of the world, yet who has read and appreciated something you have written. One instance was last week, when Victor wrote from Brazil in appreciation of a post I had written some time ago about the Korean film Poetry.

As a token of his appreciation Victor recommended a Brazilian film of which I’d never heard, viewable on YouTube. Stories Only Exist When Remembered, a first feature directed by Julia Murat in 2011, proved to be an exquisite film, a meditation on memory, time and ageing in which few words are spoken but much is implied. Continue reading Stories Only Exist When Remembered: a film of exquisite beauty”