Down to the Dee shore once more: what we need is here

Another walk in one of our favourite places – the Dee shore at Thurstaston.  So close to the city, yet walking the river’s edge here felt far from the mad spending frenzy of the year’s busiest shopping day. Wild and windswept today, but with with everything sharply illuminated by shafts of brilliant low winter sun. Clouds raced overhead, … Continue reading Down to the Dee shore once more: what we need is here

Walking the Sandstone trail: three characters in conversation

In her book, Wanderlust: A History of Walking, Rebecca Solnit characterizes walking as, ‘a state in which the mind, the body, and the world are aligned, as though they were three characters finally in conversation together, three notes suddenly making a chord’.  Solnit’s ‘three characters in conversation together’ describes pretty well the walk which saw (more … Continue reading Walking the Sandstone trail: three characters in conversation

Bugling for the Missing of WW1: cutting back to what’s left on the bone

Storm approaching over the Somme I’m driving south from Lille towards Arras, tailwinds from hurricane Bertha sending clouds skittering across the sky above the plains of Picardy – beginning a journey that will take me through the physical landscapes of the First World War – the Somme valley and the old Ypres salient.  At the same time, … Continue reading Bugling for the Missing of WW1: cutting back to what’s left on the bone

Through the dune slacks of Newborough Warren in search of Marsh Helleborine

Newborough Warren is a very special place, a wilderness of sand dunes, grassland, and damp hollows (or ‘slacks’) crucial for threatened species such as skylark, dune pansies and marsh orchids. It is one of the wildest places I have walked in where the only sound in high summer is the song of a multitude of invisible … Continue reading Through the dune slacks of Newborough Warren in search of Marsh Helleborine