A protest in Newcastle on Saturday afternoon, 25 June 2016
A protest in Newcastle on Saturday afternoon, 25 June 2016
A "Keep Corbyn" demonstration outside Parliament, 28 June 2016
A “Keep Corbyn” demonstration outside Parliament, 28 June 2016
Demonstrators at an anti-Brexit protest in Trafalgar Square on 28 June 2016
Demonstrators at an anti-Brexit protest in Trafalgar Square on 28 June 2016
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9 thoughts on “For these times…

  1. Gerry I am surprised by your enthusiastic support for Remain. A united Europe was a great idea but it all went wrong. Like Jeremy Corbyn I am a supporter of Brexit. He gave the leave campaign muted support but he didn’t support Remain enthusiastically because his heart wasn’t in it. He recognises that the EU is an un-reformable Neo-liberal elite run for the richer members and led by Germany. His problem is that many young people who seem to be his main supporters, and his fellow MPs who are all in the main neo-liberals, all wanted to remain, so he had a big dilemma. If you want to know what is actually happening read the latest articles by John Pilger ( http://johnpilger.com/articles/why-the-british-said-no-to-europe ), Steve Keen ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mofuvOUbwY at 21minutes) and Richard D Wolff ( http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=16638. )

    1. Interesting to see Pilger aligned with the ignorant and prejudiced who voted for Brexit. The EU, while pursuing some neo-liberal policies (along with every European government and most social democratic parties) as a result of intense campaigning and lobbying by progressive forces has also adopted policies on – for instance – environmental protection, consumer protection and workers’ rights, challenged the monopoly powers of multinationals like Google and Microsoft, and provided financial support to help regenerate declining regions and provide training opportunities for unemployed and disadvantaged people. The euro was a disaster and Greece has borne the brunt of that failure, but the EU is much more than the eurozone, and has brought the considerable benefits of peace and the establishment of a widening zone of respect for democracy and human rights to a continent once torn apart by war, nationalism and prejudice against ‘those people’ who live over the border. That’s why I voted Remain.

      1. Oh dear – ignorant and prejudiced eh! Did you actually read Pilger, or Steve Keen or Richard Wolff? The EU has pursued full on neo-liberal policies for 40 years and an unelected commission has passed laws without regard to individual nations wishes. They passed laws on Environmental protection did they? The last round of climate change discussions resulted in little or nothing to combat the greatest issue facing the world and what little there was is unenforceable. Google and MS are quaking in their boots at the EU challenge. As far as workers rights are concerned real wages haven’t increased in 40 years and the rich get richer. The eurozone is not just a minor blip. It was a cornerstone of German/French policy and collaboration with the IMF and WTO has impoverished Greece and is doing the same to Spain and Italy. There might have been peace in Europe over the post war years ( if we ignore the Balkans) but war has been exported to the Middle East and we are all reaping the consequences now.

  2. Gerry,
    In Scotland, as in Liverpool, we voted by a significant majority, to remain in the E.U. Imperfect though it may be, it is by far the better option to what we now have in Brexit. Those who think that the U.K. will afford higher employment, enhanced educational opportunities, better social justice, more housing, better wages, etc., etc., are either deluded or extremely naive. I’ll paraphrase Yossi – The UK is an un-reformable Neo-liberal elite run for the richer members and led by Westminster. We, in Scotland, think we at least have the possibility of a better option. Sadly, there seems to be no political party in the rest of the U.K. which seems to have the real interests of much (most?) of the population at heart.

  3. Andimac. You didn’t paraphrase me – you parodied me. The UK has an elected parliament and though nowhere near fit for purpose, is still more democratic than an unelected EU commission. All of the improvements that you refer to (education, housing, employment) are in the power of the UK parliament and should be fought for there.

  4. You are of course right, Yossi – at least in that I parodied you. Sadly, I think you’ll find that all the fighting in the U.K. Parliament is about places, privilege and party positions. I can’t recall – and I’m no youngster – the last time anything beneficial for the mass of people was enacted on the education, housing, employment fronts – to name but a few. I don’t see that changing any time soon, if at all. Of course there is an unelected E.U. Commission but there’s also an E.U. Parliament. If you think the E.U. is unreformable, good luck with reforming the U.K. Parliament – it’s as big a parody as you’re likely to encounter. I guess we’ll just have to agree to differ.

  5. Andimac. I’m no youngster myself and I do remember a Labour government changing things for the better via the UK parliamentary system. Agree with your sentiments about the lack of changes to help working class people in UK in the last 30 years. However at least there is a possibility of persuading people at an election and that is completely impossible with an unelected commission, which you’ll find is also about places, privilege and party position. We can certainly agree to differ but I’ve always found debate useful.

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